Crafting a Personal Mission Statement: Your Path to Purpose

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Have you ever found yourself wondering, in some quiet moment: ‘Is this all there is?’ Those whispers from within, hinting at a deeper yearning for happiness, satisfaction, or a clearer direction in life, are more common than you think. Life’s routine of paying bills and tackling emergencies may be balanced with wonderful trips, memorable family occasions and fun hobbies… but what truly fulfills us is pursuing these with an overarching sense of purpose.

Creating a personal mission statement is like drawing a map for the journey. Imagine navigating each day with a clear sense of purpose, leading to a life that’s not only more productive and happier, but truly fulfilling!

Without a personal roadmap, your life’s path can feel dictated by randomness, responsibilities and at times, the will of others. But it doesn’t have to be. A personal mission statement, crafted through curiosity, introspection and a bit of soul-searching, can illuminate your own vision and values, leading you to live your best life. 

Interested? Here’s a step-by-step guide:  

“Begin with the End in Mind” – Stephen Covey

To start, set up a folder or get a notebook devoted to the purpose. As you work with the steps below, jot ideas down and let writing flow. Anything you write down has a far more profound effect.  You can also record voice memos as ideas come, then make notes on what stood out after. The way this works is to mine for the thoughts and answers inside you, the place where your genuine resources reside. You’ll find by tapping into them they will organically take on a shape which you can hone into a truly authentic personal mission statement.  

  • Discover Your Strengths

To start, identify what you excel at, both professionally and personally. Highlight activities that bring you peace, joy, or that sense of being in the zone. Understanding what you’re good at and what brings you happiness is crucial for setting a clear focus.

  • Determine Your Values

Consider the question, “What is life asking of me?” Reflect on what meaning drives your responsibilities and contributions to your family and friends, in your community and at work. Now, think of your heroes. Which of their qualities inspire you or are ones you’d like to emulate. Pinpointing those contributions you find to be of worth and fulfilling will be the bedrock principles by which to guide your future actions.

  • Envision Your Best Self

Now that you’ve reacquainted yourself with your strengths and values and what makes you feel most useful and happy in each role, envision yourself at your best TODAY. It’s not about reaching back for attributes from younger years – you’ve already been there. Instead, reflect on moments you’ve felt most alive and fulfilled and jot those down as clues. It’s about who you want to be now, and how you want to make choices to effectively build the best life that is truest for you. 

  • Define Your Purpose

Assess these key areas of your life—physical, mental, social, spiritual—and how living your values should serve each. It can be clearer to you if you also list the roles you have, and do the same –two slightly different ways to get a well rounded purpose.  This isn’t an exercise about achievements you shoot for, but about detecting the principles you want to live by and who you aspire to become.

  • Envision Your Legacy

Fast forward to the future: What do you want to be remembered for by the people important to you and in each role you play? This vision can act as a powerful motivator for shaping your actions and decisions. When daily life can make you forget, or if you’re at a crossroads, remembering what you envision here can suddenly simplify your choices, often making the right one stand out clearly. 

  • Set Your Long View Goals

With all the groundwork laid, you can now articulate a few key, overarching goals. While we have many goals day to day or year to year, for this, look to broader, long range goals. Some examples may be: To cultivate a deep, trusting relationship with my life partner, to raise kids who know they are loved and valued for exactly who they are, to build a business that serves others and has a strong and satisfied staff, to be known as a person of integrity in business and my personal relationships. 

  • Write Your Mission Statement

This statement should be your guiding light, succinct yet comprehensive enough to give you direction both daily and in the long term. Whether it’s a flowing paragraph or two or bullet points, the clarity of your mission is what matters most.

A personal mission statement is more than words on paper; it’s a living document that evolves as you do. It’s about:

  • Leading a life aligned with your deepest priorities.
  • Navigating daily challenges with an eye on your long-term vision.
  • Steering clear of distractions that don’t serve your mission.
  • Becoming a creative force in your life and a positive influence on others.

In crafting your personal mission statement, you’re not just plotting a course for success but defining the very essence of your life’s journey. It’s your own constitution that aligns with your personal “Why’s” to guide both your daily actions and long-term outcomes – so worth investing a little time to do with interest and curiosity. Enjoy the process, for it is in this creation that you’ll find a deeper connection to your purpose and a more profound sense of direction in everything you do.  

And you’ll want to regularly review, revise, and refresh your mission statement to ensure it continues to reflect your deepest values and goals.

If you feel stuck or are struggling to define any of the steps above, it can help to flesh things out in conversation with a trusted mentor, teacher or coach. If you would like help to get started, to talk through any step where you may be stuck or need clearer vision, or want to revise a former mission statement, I’m here to help! Just contact me and we can discuss what best supports you on this very worthy endeavor.

 

Thinking Outside the Box: A New Paradigm

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The ability to think outside the box is more than just a skill—it’s a transformative power that can lead to greater productivity and innovation in our personal and professional lives. I’ve been reading up on this topic and have found several truly interesting  resources to share. Below are three different perspectives on thinking out of the box.  Drawing from these articles, let’s explore ways to dismantle the ‘walls’ of traditional thinking and kindle an environment where creativity and groundbreaking ideas can thrive.

The Walls of Conventional Thought

Traditional thinking can box us in with invisible walls. I found it helpful that a Forbes article took the tact of naming those walls after characteristics which limit our potential: blame, complaints, defensiveness, and closed-mindedness. It’s helpful to see each of these in the context of 4 walls to a box that you want to break free from. 

Recognize The Barriers

The first step is to recognize these barriers. The article defines each to help you do so. Then the work is to consciously strive to release those qualities.  You can do this by writing down just 2 or 3 simple changes you can make to get to the productivity and upliftment that await you beyond them. For example, they suggest these four practical starters. Look for how you can:

  • Transform blame into a sense of ownership. Owning it is actually good news, because you have the most power here to do something positive about it. 
  • Pivot from dwelling on problems to devising solutions. Looking for how to solve problems you’re in, with even the smallest positive steps forward, will feel incredibly freeing – and release a lot of energy you may not realize was keeping you down. 
  • Replace defensiveness with openness to accountability. Again, the best thing for progress is if the ball is in your court. You can gain respect for being accountable, and admiration for being willing to make something better. Defensiveness shuts doors to opportunity and connection.
  • Exchange closed-mindedness for a curiosity that welcomes new and diverse perspectives. Innovation relies on being open minded. Curiosity is a great way to test a concept or brainstorm… and it’s THE way great ideas happen. 

Instead of thinking outside the box, get rid of the box.” Deepak Chopra

 

 

Imagination and Fractal Changes

Venturing outside the box also calls for a ‘radical imagination,’ a concept focused on in a Harvard Business Review article. It’s about challenging the status quo with ‘wonder questions’. Again, the benefits of getting curious. Try frequently asking “I wonder why…” 

They introduce fractal changes – the subtle yet impactful shifts in our approach and mindset that impact the big picture. It’s a new perspective that is both simple and radically out of the box!. The article suggests that by focusing on consciously making micro-changes in both our behavior and thought processes, we create a ripple effect that can reshape the larger systems in play.

Thinking outside the box isn’t just a cliché; it’s a vital edge strategy for today’s rapidly changing world. It involves breaking free from traditional patterns,  and embracing both radical imagination and impactful fractal changes. 

As covered in last month’s blog, the journey of innovative thinking starts with a single step beyond conventional boundaries. If you’re poised to embark on this transformative journey, let’s connect and explore the possibilities together.